25th Connecticut Women's Open - First Round play is underway - all tee times delayed by 70 minutes

Gene Sarazen
Seven time major champion, including wins in all four major championships, and member of six consecutive Ryder Cup teams.
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Glenna Collett Vare
Six time U.S. Women's Amateur Champion, Winner of the Canadian Ladies Open and French Ladies Open, and 1975 World Golf Hall of Fame Inductee.
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JJ. Henry
Winner of three PGA Tour tournaments and one of only three American-born players to finish inside the Top-125 in earnings every year since 2001.
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William Burke
1931 U.S. Open Champion, U.S. Ryder Cup team member in 1931, and 1928 North & South Open Champion.
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Tony Manero
1936 U.S. Open champion 1936 and member of the U.S. Ryder Cup team in 1937.
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Julius N. Boros
U.S. Open champion 1952 and 1963, National PGA champion 1968, and member of the U.S. Ryder Cup team in 1959, 1963, 1965, and 1967.
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ABOUT THE CONNECTICUT GOLF HALL OF FAME

When the Connnecticut Golf Hall of Fame was established by the Greater Hartford Jaycees in 1955, there were some in-depth impressive candidates with supportable Connecticut connections from whom the first honoree could be chosen: four Men’s U.S. Open champions, two Women’s U.S. Amateur champions; a winner of the Men’s U.S. Open, the National PGA, the British Open and the Masters; and a winner of the U.S., British, Canadian, and French Amateur championships.

Additionally, there were at least another half dozen who had distinguished themselves in state and regional competition, or otherwise as significant contributors to Connecticut’s rich golf tradition. Singularly faithful to both of these standards, the choice of Robert Moir Grant as the state Golf Hall’s first honoree was undisputed, either by members of the selection committee or by the Connecticut golf community. Indeed, the always articulate Tommy Armour, equating Grant with the immortal Bob Jones, both of whom he knew well, said that each was a most proper metaphor for all that was good about golf: pure competitive spirit, individual pride and dignity, and good sportsmanship.

In 1991, the Connecticut State Golf Association assumed stewardship of the Connecticut Golf Hall of Fame with the dedicated intention of carrying on the successful selection process so well exercised by the Greater Harford Jaycees. Led by Gene Sarazen and Julius Boros, the Connecticut Golf Hall of Fame collectively boasts 21 major golf championship titles: six U.S. Opens, five National PGAs, three National Senior PGAs, two Masters, two British Amateurs, two U.S. Women’s Amateurs and one British Open.

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Hall of Fame Inductees

DISTINGUISHED GOLF ACHIEVEMENT

Year

Name

Accomplishments

1955

Robert M. Grant

Connecticut State Amateur champion 1932, 1946, 1952; New England Amateur champion 1932, 1954; President, CSGA, 1948-49; State Team captain 1940-41, 1962-65

1956

Charles C. Clare

Connecticut State Amateur champion 1931, 1933, 1935; New England Amateur champion 1934; President, CSGA, 1952-53; State Team captain 1934-39.

1958

Frank D. Ross

Connecticut State Amateur champion 1926, 1930; New England Amateur champion 1933; U.S. Senior Amateur Association champion 1953; President, CSGA, 1938-39; State Team captain 1932-33, 1958-61.

1959

Georgiana M. Bishop

U.S. Women's Amateur champion 1904, medalist 1914, co-medalist 1905; Connecticut Women's Amateur champion 1920-22, 1927.

About the Connecticut Golf

Additionally, there were at least another half dozen who had distinguished themselves in state and regional competition, or otherwise as significant contributors to Connecticut’s rich golf tradition. Singularly faithful to both of these standards, the choice of Robert Moir Grant as the state Golf Hall’s first honoree was undisputed, either by members of the selection committee or by the Connecticut golf community. Indeed, the always articulate Tommy Armour, equating Grant with the immortal Bob Jones, both of whom he knew well, said that each was a most proper metaphor for all that was good about golf: pure competitive spirit, individual pride and dignity, and good sportsmanship.

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